Icynene Spray Foam Insulation for New Baptist Church in Dumfries

Designers of a new community Baptist Church, nearing completion in Dumfries, turned to spray applied insulation specialists, Icynene to solve a complex insulation challenge.

The new Church is a 2000sqm, multi-purpose building designed by Glasgow based, McLean Architects and built in the Georgetown district of Dumfries in the Scottish Borders.

The building was conceived as a flexible-use community hub comprising worship, conference and youth facilities together a full specification games hall and multi-use games area.

For the games hall, McLean Architects designed an 18.00x 18.00 m sq 8.00m high structure comprising a 140mm thick internal leaf of concrete blockwork with an external steel frame, supporting fibre-cement rain-screen cladding.

Here, the placement of insulation between the blockwork and the cladding system proved problematic. Project Architect Kirsty Wilson explains. “The complex latticework of steel frame for the cladding made it extremely difficult to install conventional rigid board insulation. It would have been a hugely labour-intensive and expensive process and achieving the required air tightness standards would have been pretty much impossible”

Spray foam insulation

Specialist insulation contractors, JSJ Foam Insulation Ltd, who were brought in by main contractors Ashleigh Building of Dumfries, recommended Icynene, a high-performance spray foam insulation system which would be applied directly to the outer face of the blockwork, then covered by the cladding.

Icynene is a predominantly water blown insulation which is applied using a pressurised gun system. Foam is applied as a two-component mixture that comes together at the tip of a gun forming a foam that expands 100-fold within seconds of application, sealing all gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces, virtually eliminating cold bridging and air leakage.

Air leakage can cause up to 40% of heat loss from a building and traditional forms of insulation are relatively inefficient in sealing the box, as they cannot completely fill all voids or seal the interface between the insulation and the building structure. Nor can they cope with small structural movements which will often lead to air gaps, particularly in difficult to treat situations where access is poor and when voids are of complex geometry.

Jim Shearer of JSJ Foam Insulation takes up the story. “Icynene is nothing like the urethane foams of 20 years ago. Icynene uses water as the blowing agent so the reaction between the two components produces C02 which makes the foam expand.”

He continued, “We sprayed Icynene directly onto the blockwork and over the concealed sections of cladding framework. We had free access to the existing scaffolding platforms so the spraying process was quick and straightforward. We had job done in under a week.” Said Mr Shearer.

Open or closed cell composition

Spray foam insulation can be either open or closed cell in composition. Open cell is extremely vapour open and will allow moisture vapour to pass freely through it allowing the building to breathe naturally.

For the Dumfries Baptist Church project, Icynene MDC-200 HFO, a closed cell foam that uses Hydro-Flouro Olovine [HFO] as a blowing agent, was used. HFO is an environmentally friendly material which has a Global Warming Potential [GWP] of only 2 and an Ozone depletion rating of 0 [Zero].

Closed cell foams tend to be much less vapour permeable than open cell and are considerably more rigid and hard. They resist the passage of liquid water and are ideal for use in conjunction with the rain-screen cladding system specified. Closed cell foams also have a greater thermal resistance than open cell foams.

Cost efficient solution

Icynene MDC-200 foam insulation was applied to the entire outer leaf of the games hall, an area of approximately 550 sqm and to a thickness of 150mm. The work was completed over a four-day period.

According to Icynene, spray applied insulation is broadly comparable in cost to conventional fibre based and rigid board type insulation materials however, its speed of installation, minimal waste and its ability to perform in difficult to treat applications means spray foam can be an extremely cost-effective solution for a variety of projects up to and including those built to Passivhaus standards.

Construction of the Baptist Church buildings began in early 2017 and is scheduled for completion by Easter, 2018.


Icynene Awarded Energy Saving Trust Approval

Spray foam insulation specialists, Icynene has achieved the prestigious Energy Saving Trust [EST] approval for its high performance, Icynene Foamlite system.
Icynene Foamlite is a spray applied insulation system specifically developed for use in wall, roof and underfloor applications where high levels of insulation and air tightness are required.

When applied, Icynene Foamlite expands 100-fold within the first few seconds, sealing all gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces completely eliminating cold bridging.

Icynene Foamlite can be applied directly to breathable and non-breathable roof membranes without the need for an air gap. Because the foam has a soft, open-cell structure it allows the free passage of moisture vapour, allowing buildings to breathe naturally. It also means that roof timbers in contact with the foam will not “sweat” and promote mould growth.

According to Icynene UK Managing Director, Paddy Leighton, “Winning EST approval is a robust process and a huge achievement for Icynene and we are delighted to have our products recognised for their high performance”

The Energy Saving Trust is an independent and impartial organisation which promotes energy efficiency across the domestic housing sector, helping consumers save energy in their homes.

EST also provides advice, research and consultancy services to help consumers, businesses, governments and communities achieve sustainable use of energy.
Icynene provides a 25-year warranty for all its insulation products and as well as carrying EST Approval, Foamlite is also BBA Certified.


Spray Applied Insulation - High Performance Heat Loss Mitigation

Paddy Leighton, UK Director for Spray Foam insulation specialists Icynene, looks at heat loss in buildings and how new, high performance insulation systems can improve comfort levels in retrofit and new build applications.

When Britain began its post war building boom, coal was king and energy was relatively cheap, so little thought was given to heat loss and few buildings were constructed with any meaningful level of insulation.

Seventy years on and the world is very different. With sky-high heating costs and a greater focus on the need to reduce energy consumption, builders, landlords and homeowners all take the insulation of their properties much more seriously.

But before we look at insulation it’s important to understand what’s involved. Insulation in a building is introduced to provide resistance to heat flow. The more heat flow resistance the insulation provides, the lower the likely heating [and cooling] costs. Good levels of insulation not only reduce heating and cooling costs, but also improve comfort.

How Insulation Works

To understand how insulation works it helps to understand heat flow, which involves three basic mechanisms -- conduction, convection, and radiation.
Conduction is the way heat moves through materials, such as when a spoon placed in a hot cup of coffee conducts heat through its handle to your hand.
Convection is the way heat circulates through liquids and gases, and is why lighter, warmer air rises, and cooler, denser air sinks.

Radiant heat travels in a straight line and heats anything solid in its path that absorbs its energy – think about sitting in front of a roaring open fire and how you feel warm on the side facing the fire but less so on the other!

Insulation materials work by slowing conductive heat flow and to a lesser extent, convective heat flow. Regardless of the mechanism, heat flows from warmer to cooler areas until there is no longer a temperature difference. In a typical home, this means that in winter, heat flows directly from all heated living spaces to adjacent unheated roof voids, garages, cellars and particularly to the outdoors. Heat flow will also move indirectly through interior ceilings, walls, and floors, wherever there is a difference in temperature.

To maintain comfort, the heat lost in the winter must be replaced by heat from a central heating system or other means. Adequate levels of insulation will decrease this heat loss by providing an effective resistance to the conductive flow of heat.

How can we insulate effectively?

Retrospective insulation – that which is fitted after construction the building – has traditionally taken the form of thick layers of glass or mineral fibre placed between rafters in the roof void, or blown in cavity wall insulation such as styrene beads or mineral wool.

These forms of insulation work well but they do not significantly address the crucial factor of preventing convective heat loss.

In the UK, U values are the measure of insulation’s ability to limit conductive heat flow - the lower the U value the better the resistance to heat loss. However, it should be noted that up to 40% of a building’s heat loss can be attributed to air leakage.

Moisture vapour in the air within a building carries heat and moist humid air can support up to 4000 times more heat energy than dry air. As air leaks out of a building it carries with it this moisture vapour and with it, heat.

Therefore, the best way to increase the energy efficiency of a building is not merely to reduce U values as required by Building Regs, but rather to combine U value reduction with an air barrier – creating a “sealed box” effect to reduce air [and heat] leakage to a minimum. [*Footnote]

Spray applied insulation

Traditional forms of insulation are relatively inefficient in sealing the box, in that they cannot completely fill all voids or seal the interface between the insulation and the building structure. Nor can they cope with small structural movements which will often lead to air gaps, particularly in difficult to treat situations where access is poor and/or when voids are of complex geometry. This can lead to cold bridging and thermal by-pass, with the consequent risk of localised condensation and inevitable dampness.

Air leakage can be eliminated by the introduction of an air barrier. These can take many forms but must be installed with great care if they are to perform as desired. Real world experience also shows that the more difficult a component is to install, the less likely it is to be installed correctly!

The modern alternative is spray foam insulation, which is applied using a pressurised gun system. Here, foams are applied as a two-component mixture that come together at the tip of a gun forming a foam that expands 100-fold within seconds of application, sealing all gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces, virtually eliminating cold bridging and air leakage.

When selecting spray applied insulation it is important to understand a number of factors: Unlike the urethane foams of 20 years ago, modern spray foams such as Icynene Foam Lite use water as the blowing agent. This means that the reaction between the two components produces C02 which causes the foam to expand.

As Foam Lite expands, the cells of the foam burst and the CO2 is replaced by air. Consequently, from an environmental perspective, Icynene has a Global Warming Potential [GWP] of 1 and an Ozone Depletion Potential [ODP] of 0 [Zero]. Icynene does not, therefore emit and harmful gases once cured.

Open cell or closed cell composition

Spray foam insulation can be either open or closed cell in composition. Open cell is extremely vapour open and will allow moisture vapour to pass freely through it allowing the building to breathe naturally. Open cell foam will not soak up or “wick” water.

Closed cell foams tend to be much less vapour permeable than open cell and are considerably more rigid and hard. They resist the passage of liquid water and although not entirely waterproof, will prevent it from passing through a structure for a considerable period of time. Closed cell foams often have a greater thermal resistance than open cell foams.

Chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs], which were developed in the 1930s and frequently used in spray insulation many years ago, are recognised as the main cause of the ozone depletion. CFC's can last for 100 years and 1 CFC molecule can result in the loss of 100,000 ozone molecules. In light of this, when spray applied insulation is used it is important to verify that the material does not contain any chemicals that may potentially cause damage to the environment.

Where does spray applied insulation fit?

Spray applied insulation tends to be more expensive than conventional fibre based and rigid board type insulation materials and is usually applied by specialist contractors using bespoke equipment. However, its speed of installation, minimal waste and its ability to perform in difficult to treat applications and the fact that it can be injected into voids that would otherwise require invasive tear-out of surfaces, means spray foam is a cost-effective solution when compared to rigid board type insulation for both refurbishment and new build projects.

Open cell spray insulation has been used on many historic buildings where its non-invasive installation methods have allowed the continued occupation of the building with the minimal of disruption to users and negligible impact to the fabric or the breathability of the structure.

At the other end of the scale, the fact that spray foam insulation can create air-tight envelope has also made it the insulation material of choice in new build homes built to Passivhaus-type standards.


ICYNENE spay applied insulation trials for difficult to treat flats in Glasgow

Reidvale Housing Association in the Dennistoun suburb of Glasgow, turned to spray applied installation specialists Icynene for a solution to the insulation of a number of difficult-to-heat flats under their control.

Reidvale HA manages over 900 houses and flats in Glasgow’s east end, many of which date back to Victorian times.

At the end of 2016, Reidvale began an insulation assessment programme in conjunction with Hab Lab -John Gilbert Architects (Improving the longevity of your housing stock while reducing fuel poverty for tenants) on three of their older, ground floor flats to find out the best way to insulate them and reduce heating costs to improve living conditions for their tenants.

Michael McMenamin, Maintenance Manager explains. “We chose three of the most difficult to treat properties for the trials. They are all ground floor flats in pre-1919, stone-built tenements, which have solid outside walls and virtually no insulation. Plaster-boarded stud walls had been fitted during improvement in the 1980s but this did little to slow the heat loss. Fuel usage for the gas central heating systems was pretty high”

He continued, “The plan was to insulate the stud walls and underfloor voids and reduce air leakage to a minimum. Air leakage is one of the main sources of heat loss and we are aiming to reduce these conditions as far as practicable. Consequently, we will fit a combination of mechanical ventilation and heat recovery units, as required, to each of the flats. Monitoring equipment will also be installed to assess internal and external humidity levels, heat-loss reduction and fuel consumption over a full year period”.

Icynene Spray applied insulation was specified for the trials because of its speed of application, high performance and breathability. Icynene is a water blown, open cell foam that expands 100-fold within seconds of application, sealing all gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces, virtually eliminating cold bridging and air leakage.

Because of its “vapour open” composition, it allows moisture vapour to pass through it, allowing the building to breathe naturally and prevent condensation.
Installation was undertaken by locally based Icynene contractor, Jim Shearer of JSJ Insulation. “Access to the underfloor void was straight forward by simply lifting the large format chipboard flooring boards. Here we fitted a breathable roofing membrane to the underside of the 6x2” floor joists and sprayed a layer of foam about 150mm thick. We repeated this under each of the rooms – about 50-60sqm in all”.

“For the walls, we injected Icynene through a series of 20mm holes drilled in the plasterboard, directly onto the inner face of the outside wall, giving us 100mm thick layer of foam”. explained Mr Shearer.

“Each flat took us about a day and a half to complete – much faster than if we were using conventional rigid board insulation. Our use of a thermal imaging camera also helped identify any critical voids and cold spots that needed special attention” he added.

Traditional forms of insulation are relatively inefficient in sealing the box, in that they cannot completely fill all voids or seal the interface between the insulation and the building structure. Nor can they cope with small structural movements which will often lead to air gaps, particularly in difficult to treat situations where access is poor and/or when voids are of complex geometry. This can lead to cold bridging and thermal by-pass, with the consequent risk of localised condensation and inevitable dampness.

The modern alternative is spray foam insulation, which is applied using a pressurised gun system. Here, foams are applied as a two-component mixture that come together at the tip of a gun, forming a foam that expands instantly, sealing gaps, service holes and hard to reach spaces, virtually eliminating cold bridging and air leakage.

According to Michael McMenemin, the Icynene insulation trials at Reidvale HA will continue throughout the year. If proved to be successful they should lead to similar treatment of up to 100 additional properties under their management.


Domaine Vincent Pinard Winery

Known as one of the leading wine producing regions of France, the commune of Bué in the Loire Valley is one of the few communes able to produce Sancerre wines. One winery has taken the innovative step to insulate their wine cellars with spray foam insulation aligning with its own environmental policy.

The commune of Bué in the famed Loire Valley wine-making region is one of the few that is able to make appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) Sancerre wine. Roughly two hours south of Paris and only 40 minutes from the city of Bourges, the area is the epicentre of dry Sauvignon Blanc and full-bodied Pinot Noir wine.

One local vintner, Domaine Vincent Pinard, one of the oldest and most renowned in the region, became attracted to preserving their cellars with spray foam insulation to better regulate the temperatures needed for the wine-making process.

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North Oaks Home, Minnesota, USA

Close to the picturesque Pleasant Lake and overlooking the historic James J. Hill barn, creamery and blacksmith shop, this elegant and rustic home in North Oaks in Minnesota has become a model of energy efficient living with a HERS Index of 64.

A northern suburb of Saint Paul, Minnesota, North Oaks is a small, quaint community centered on the picturesque Pleasant Lake. Originally purchased by Saint Paul magnate, James J. Hill in 1883 to function as a breeding and hobby farm, the area is now home to over 4,500 residents.

In 2013, the team of building professionals from Bob Michels Construction, Inc. worked to transform a rustic 4,279 sq. ft. home into an energy efficient residence to increase the functionality and ow of the property as well as take advantage of the surrounding views.

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Fifth Town Cheese Factory, Canada

Set against the picturesque, agrarian landscape of Prince Edward County in Ontario, this 4,200 sq. ft. cheese factory is the vision of a sustainability enthusiast with a passion for all things dairy. The facility holds a Platinum LEED certification due to its myriad of green sustainability initiatives.

Within the heart of Ontario’s dairy community in the picturesque, agrarian landscape of Prince Edward County in Ontario, the Fifth Town Cheese Factory has become a brilliant example of adopting sustainable, green technologies into agricultural construction.

Owned by sustainability enthusiast Petra Cooper, the Fifth Town Cheese Factory is a mixed use facility that has been awarded a Platinum certification under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design – New Construction (LEED - NC) rating system.

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“The Treehouse” in Gloucestershire as Featured on Channel 4's "Grand Designs"

Another fantastic application of Icynene this time to the famous Grand Designs project “The Treehouse” in Gloucestershire. Icynene was used in the walls, floor and ceilings to this wonderful project.


Video: The Boxpark Croydon Project

An excellent video on The Boxpark Croydon project, this was an application of Icynene Ultraseal Select to over 6000m2 of an innovative commercial park which will host over 40 rising drink and food providers, Icynene brought a number of excellent qualities to this project as outlined in the video, when choosing spray foam choose Icynene, there is a difference.


Icynene Insulation for this Windswept, Cumbrian Barn Conversion

The insulation of a 120-year old Cumbrian barn conversion proved a difficult challenge for this Father and Son farming partnership. Here, ECO Building News takes a look at a new technique in thermal insulation that’s gaining popularity in these difficult to treat projects.

On the exposed Furness peninsular in Cumbria, close to the Lake District Fells, there is precious little shelter from the fierce, westerly gales that batter this part of the Irish Sea coastline.

Read the full case study


Technitherm® successfully insulates cavities in a building in a severe exposure area subject to flooding

technitherm case studyThe Client:
Bank of Ireland

The Problem:
The bank is situated next to an industrial estate where the road in to the estate is one and a half metres above the ground level of the bank.
During the winter snow storms, the snow drifted against the side wall of the bank, and this was added to as more piles of snow from the roads being cleared were put against the side wall.
As the snow melted, the melt waters soaked through the outer brick leaf of the side wall and into the cavity. This was exacerbated by the wind driven rain against the wall and resulted in the cavity flooding and the water soaking through the inner leaf of the cavity, causing severe dampness on the inner walls of the bank.
The problem was to dry out the walls, find a flood resilient material which would also insulate the cavity to a high standard. There was also concern that the flooded cavity might have structurally weakened the wall.

The Solution:
To dry out the walls, some outer leaf bricks were removed from the side wall and rubble in the cavity was cleaned out to a depth of 300mm and the bricks were replaced.
Technitherm was then installed into the cavity as flood resilient cavity wall insulation. Being closed cell insulation Technitherm has been independently tested to prove its flood resilience, so Technitherm was able to prevent further ingress of water and solve any structural problems caused by the flood waters.

The Outcome:
The walls of the Bank are now flood resilient, removing any further danger of dampness on the inner walls. Technitherm has also provided insulation values which match Building regulations and eliminated any structural problems caused by flooding.


Engineering pull‐test on Technitherm® injected cavity wall

technitherm case studyThe Test – Step 1

An unstable cavity wall was injected with Technitherm®. All the wall ties were isolated from the outer leaf, and then a chase cut through the bricks and mortar to the foam to create a 1m² free standing, brick panel.

technitherm case studyThe Test – Step 2

A sturdy steel frame was then added to the panel, and connected to a load cell. Once connected, the panel was subjected to increasing pull‐forces from the load cell, under the supervision of the specialist engineer in charge of the test.

technitherm case studyThe Results

At 1.818 tonnes/m², with no adhesion failure at all, the test was aborted to prevent any damage to the inner leaf. Technitherm® is, therefore, proven to provide a simple and highly effective solution to cavity wall failure, whilst insulating buildings to Building Regulation Standard BS 7457:1994 (BBA Cert No. 97/3426), with zero ozone depletion potential (ODP). A low GWP version is also available.


Technitherm: Homeowners in flood risk areas

The Problem
Flood waters can penetrate cavity walls and cause major damage to the outer wall, the cavity wall ties, any fibrous insulation, the inner wall and decor. 3 million houses are at risk.

technitherm case study

The Solution
Technitherm®, a water resistant, closed cell cavity insulant:

  • Prevents corrosion of wall ties
  • Prevents insulation damage
  • Replaces wall ties where they are already in disrepair

The Outcome
Technitherm® is shown to be the best performing type of cavity wall product according to a recent report on Flood Protection issued by DEFRA, DCLG and The Environment Agency. The report states that cavity wall insulation should be rigid closed cell materials, as these retain their physical integrity and have low moisture take up when exposed to flood waters.

www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/flood_performance.pdf (Table 6.2, p75)

technitherm case study


A Traditionally Built Cottage

The Problem:
A traditionally built cottage consisting of two “leaves” of random stone with a variable width cavity. The outer leaves were buckling due to inadequate tying and foundation movement, and the energy efficiency of the cottage was very poor, as conventional wall insulation could not be installed for a number of reasons. Foundation repairs could not be undertaken due to the danger of the walls collapsing during the work. Pressure grouting and partial demolition were considered unacceptable due to instability and cost, and neither measure would improve the energy efficiency of the cottage.

technitherm case study

The Solution:

Technitherm® was injected into the cavity to stabilise and insulate the walls so that underpinning could be carried out, followed by local rebuilding of the buckled panels. The injection was carried out over 3 days to minimise disruption of the random stone outer leaf. Such was the success of the Technitherm® installation that not a single stone was displaced and the process was completed with the owner in occupation.

The Outcome:

After treatment with Technitherm® the walls were so stable that it was unnecessary to undertake any further structural repairs. Joints in the outer stone leaf were simply raked free of old mortar and re‐pointed. The cost was less than 1/6th of other accepted repair techniques. The cottage was weatherproofed due to Technitherm® being hydrophobic closed cell PUR.

Technitherm® enhanced the insulation of the walls and draught‐proofed the cottage in the single installation, and now the owner is enjoying warmer living conditions and lower energy bills. The structural repair was completed leaving the wall virtually unblemished.


Linen Mill Film and Television Studios

Linen Mill Film Studios

Formerly used as an Ulster Weavers bleachworks factory, the 32-acre Linen Mill Film and Television Studios in Banbridge, Northern Ireland had Icynene LD-C- 50 installed for acoustic and condensation purposes. Film and television productions filmed at the studios now benefit from improved acoustics and minimized external noise. .. read more


Icynene Spray Foam Selected for Prestigious Cancer Care Centre

mcc

The Icynene Spray Foam Insulation System has been selected as the insulation of choice for the new build Maggies Cancer Care Centre in Aberdeen. Icynene was selected by the projects architects Halliday, Fraser, Munrow as the insulation of choice for the walls and roof due to its long successful history, comprehensive testing and certification, unique non toxic properties and its ability to provide a complete insulation and air barrier in one application, U values achieved for walls and roof were 0.14 and in some areas as low as 0.10... read more

The work was carried out by Icynene accredited contractor Building Insulation Services, Penicuik, Edinburgh.


Timber Frame Kit, Biggar Lanarkshire

 

New build timber frame project involving the application of Icynene LD-C-50 to the roof and external walls.

The roof was sprayed to a depth of 200mm, external walls to a depth between studs of 145mm. Additional work to reduce noise from airborne sound transmission was carried out by spraying internal partition walls with 75mm of Icynene.

The work was carried out over a number of months to suit progress on site and on completion the Client’s comments included ‘staff were very helpful and knowledgeable’ with the overall experience of our company being ‘excellent’.


Historic Building extension, Milnathort

 

Project comprised masonry built extension to an existing building. The walls incorporated an insulated cavity and were strapped out internally with our foam being applied direct to the inner blockwork between studs to a depth of 50mm. The roof space was sprayed to a depth of 150mm. Work was completed to suit the Client’s programme with them saying they are ‘delighted with the insulation’, the quality of the installation ‘excellent’ and they would be ’happy to act as a reference'.


Lochalsh and Skye Housing Association

 

A project involving injection of Icynene Pour fill formula to provide additional insulation to older housing stock of Lochalsh and Skye Housing Association. A series of holes were drilled at 600mm centres and the material injected to fill the void behind the strapped and lined walls. Generally the work was completed within one day avoiding additional costs associated with the need to decant tenants. The success of this contract led to further work, one of which was a major project comprising the treatment of 70 their properties in Skye.


Icynene selected for Linen Mill Film Studios Banbridge Co Down

 

The Icynene Insulation system was selected for this film studio to eliminate airborne sound coming for traffic, aeroplanes etc and also to prevent condensation occurring on the underside of the roof during filming, the unit was successfully insulated within a two day period.
Project completed by Icynene Contractor Thermloc Ltd Ballyclare, Co Antrim.


Modern House on Isle of Skye

 

The complicated geometry, used by Architects Rural Design, to parts of the roof, caused a lot of head scratching by the site management team on how to achieve a high level of air tightness using tapes and membranes as specified by the Architects. It was decided that the two most intricate areas of the roof would be treated using Icynene spray foam insulation, as it was decided all around, that membranes could not be made to work effectively in these areas.

The Icynene rig was brought to site and in less than 2 hours these areas were treated with Icynene Spray Foam Insulation, guaranteeing an exceptional level of air tightness plus very effective insulation. The remainder of the building had membranes applied.
Icynene Contractor Kishorn Developments, Kishorn, Inverness & Isle of Skye


Isle of Muck Village Hall

The new village hall built on the Isle of Muck has been fully insulated using Icynene’s LD-C-50 spray foam insulation.  As the logistics of getting materials to the Isle of Muck was creating a lot of problems to the main contractor, the solution of insulating with Icynene meant that the insulation could be taken to the island in 6 barrels in the back of a van, as opposed to the two 40 foot long artic loads of ridged board, which is what was originally specified by Dualchas, the architects for the project.

The Icynene was installed at 280mm thick around a steel and timber frame, and was completed in less than a week. Fitting ridged boards would have taken considerably longer, and would never give the high level of air tightness required by today modern buildings. Using Icynene on the project was the most responsible thing to do;  a low carbon foot print has been achieved through greatly reduced road and sea transport, and a much higher level of building efficiencies.
Icynene Contractor Kishorn Developments, Kishorn, Inverness & Isle of Skye


Park Homes Project, Edinburgh

 

Images show the application of The Icynene Insulation System to the external walls and underside of the floor to a number of Park Homes projects in Scotland, this resulted in savings in excess of 50% on heating bills and a huge increase in the overall comfort of the home.
Work was carried out by Icynene accredited contractor Building Insulation Services Penicuik.